Orpington Labour Party

Labour Rose

Recent letters to the Guardian and Observer by Orpington CLP Secretary Nigel de Gruchy

Nigel’s thoughts on the way forward for Labour and answers criticism of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership in recent Guardian articles. He suggests giving the Labour leadership time and reiterating Orpington CLP’s concern that the Tory’s got away with blaming Labour for the financial crisis and not the Tory supporting financial institutions that caused the 2008 crash – many of which where bailed out of debt by a Labour government….

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The Guardian Thursday 10th December 2015

“Time to Unite Labour’s Democratic Left”

The key to unlocking Labour’s path back to power is to bridge the huge gulf generally existing between the party in parliament and the rest. The key is neither solely in the left nor right hand. It is in the decent yearning of most people that rejects the extremes of current Toryism but favours socially useful economic expansion to improve living standards and secure equitable deficit reduction. It opposes further damaging indulgence of the worlds of finance, debt and property booms. It supports fair taxation and recognises the damage of much privatisation and the need to tackle unregulated globalisation and dysfunctional corporations. It believes in the public control of well-resourced and efficient public services capable of reform within a democratic framework. The likelihood of Jeremy Corbyn converting such good policies into a general election victory could then be assessed in two to three years’ time.
Nigel de Gruchy
Orpington, Kent

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The Observer Sunday 27th December 2015

“Labour can survive and stay united under Jeremy Corbyn”

Peter Hyman’s “existential challenge” to Labour is interesting but his criticism is unduly harsh in some cases and missed more crucial mistakes elsewhere. I doubt if any party could have survived in government after the crash of 2007-08. Hyman made no mention of the catastrophic failure to nail the Big Tory Lie that the financial crash was entirely Labour’s fault and nothing to do with the banks. In accepting Osborne’s agenda, Labour leaders failed to highlight simple ONS facts that Brown/Darling’s policies had returned UK to 1% growth by mid-2010 while also reducing the deficit by £38bn. Instead, Labour reduced itself to saying it would cut more sympathetically than the Tories.

Hyman wants Labour to develop a new vision offering hope to millions beyond the narrow confines of party membership while insisting that economic credibility be re-established and anti-capitalism avoided. But how can hope be offered without challenging the juggernauts of unregulated globalisation and privatisation crushing jobs, lowering wages, worsening conditions at work, eroding family and civic life and putting home ownership beyond the reach of low and middle-income earners? Is no one to challenge out-of-control, tax-dodging corporations operating in dysfunctional markets for the benefit of the few at the expense of the many?

Hyman’s branding of all Corbyn’s followers as “wanting to win an argument, not an election” is a travesty. Most want to win both, believing that you have to win the former to secure the latter.
Nigel de Grouchy
Orpington, Kent

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